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Not in Employment, Education or Training (NEET)

More than one in six young people are living on benefits because they are neither in education, employment of training ('NEET'). No fewer than 935,000 16- to 24-year-olds are a 'Neet' - up 15% in just one year. It means that 15.6% of young people in England are now unemployed, or are not at college or on a training course - up from 13.6% last year.
LGA/Centre for Social Justice 2009

According to the Labour Force Survey the employment rate for those aged 18-24 fell from 63.4% in 2008 to 59.5% in 2009, whilst the rate for those aged 25-49 fell only 0.8% and those aged 50-69 fell by only 0.1%.
EHRC/LFS 2009

The unemployment rate for 18-24 year-olds rose from 12% in 2008 to 16.2% in 2009, an increase of 4.2%. While the rate for those aged 25-49 rose by only 1.7% and for those aged 50-69 rose by only 1.3%
EHRC/LFS 2009

The redundancy rate in 2009 so far has been much higher for those aged 18-24 years and is more than double that for those aged 50-69 years.
EHRC/LFS 2009

Long-term youth unemployment will almost treble between now and the end of 2011. The number of long-term unemployed young people will rise from 130,000 in May 2009 to 350,000 by December 2011.
Centre for Cities 2009

ILO estimates from Oxford Economics project unemployment will reach 2.94 million by the end of 2011. Based on the current proportion of unemployed people who are aged between 16-24 (40%), this means 1.18 million young people will be unemployed by the end of 2011. Based on previous recessions, 30% of these (354, 000) are likely to be unemployed for more than 12 months.
Centre for Cities 2009

Under 25s constitute one in five (21%) of Brtiain's working population, yet now make up two in five (40%) of the unemployed.
Centre for Cities 2009

Of the total 2.26 million people out of work, 888,000 (39%) are aged between 16-24; an increase of 190,000 young people in the last year.
Centre for Cities 2009

The employment rate for 'older' people (those aged 50-69 years) is currently at 56.1%. While for "younger" people (those aged 18-24) is currently at 63.4%.
EHRC/DWP 2009

Britain is a lowly 25th out of 29 in the OECD league table for amount of young people not in education, employment or training.
Institute for Public Policy Research 2009

An increasing number of people with university qualifications are applying for apprenticeships rather than graduate jobs. This increased competition has placed extra pressure on those who are not in education, employment or training. However the 'NEET' group are likely to be more enthusiastic and loyal employees than someone who feels over-qualified, because that job really is their aspiration.
Institute for Public Policy Research 2009

The Government envisages that a fifth of all young people in England will be undertaking an apprenticeship within the next decade. The report by Lord Leitch (HM Treasury, 2006) recommended that there be at least 500,000 apprenticeships in the UK by 2020, with at least 400,000 of these being in England. The Government projects that the number successfully completing an apprenticeship will rise from over 100,000 now to around 190,000 in 2020. This expansion will require a substantial increase in apprenticeship places provided by employers.
Low Pay Commission 2009